Omar Boraie Supports Cancer Research With $1.5 Million Pledge

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey made an announcement in October of 2015, regarding the new Omar Boraie Chair in Genomic Science. In an article originally published by NewsWise, this new chair was created to help drive groundbreaking research in the precision medicine field, named for Omar Boraie.

Endowed chairs within this program are committed to this academic discipline and plan to ensure its support and progression. The New Brunswick developer Omar Boraie made a $1.5 million pledge to help support this program, as part of Rutgers University’s campaign, the “18 Chair Challenge.” This campaign guarantees a $3 million endowment match to each of the 18 new chairs, with the help of an anonymous donor who has guaranteed a $1.5 million match to each of these chairs.

This genomic science and precision medicine field is currently changing how professionals are approaching the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. While this field is relatively new, says yahoo.com, it analyzes and treats tumors on a genetic level. This practice lets oncologists product personalized therapies for each patient, ensuring better results. This practice has gained national importance in recent years, as President Obama announced the launch of an initiative that would be focused on finding cures for cancers and other diseases, named the Precision Medicine Initiative.

Even though there are now numerous cancer centers that are practicing this tumor gene sequencing, the Rutgers Cancer Institute was one of the very first to do so in the country. They are also the only one in the entire state that applies this sequencing as a precision medicine approach to enhance the care of patients. This genomic sequencing has been particularly important, helping to find therapies for those with rare cancers and for those whose options for treatment have been ineffective.

Omar Boraie claims that the scientists at Rutgers have been making very significant advances within the precision medicine field in regards to cancer patients whose disease no longer responds to treatment. In an interview on the NY Times, he said that he hopes that this new pledge will help create support that will allow their work to exceed their own goals and expectations. Boraie hopes that his pledge, along with the anonymous donor’s pledge match, will inspire many others to do the very same.

According to Rutgers Cancer Institute, Omar Boraie has been an essential part of New Brunswick becoming the “Healthcare City.” Boraie’s support will have a substantial impact on the research being done all over the country and on the overall treatment cancer patients receive.